The Vineyard of the Future is flying with Qantas!

Be it during takeoff, in the lounge, or online, with Qantas’ Qbusiness coverage on “wine boffins” this month, all you need is five good minutes to understand what The Vineyard of the Future is doing for the wine industry.

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From digital vineyards using drones and its MUASIP platform to monitor vast vineyard and other crop fields, to easy-to-use apps like VitiCanopy, that will instantly analyse canopy architecture, the effect of vineyard leaf canopies on the quality of grape and yields, the “holy grail for winemakers” is not out of reach (Nicholls, 2017). And if your vineyard happens to have a canine member, they could join you in the field to detect pests and diseases, as “man’s best friend” has the ability to sniff out the “bad” pheromones from insects up to 60 centimetres deep in the soil (Fuentes & De Bei, 2016).

But most importantly, as Dr Sigfredo Fuentes, Senior Lecturer in Wine Science at the School of Agriculture and Food, belonging to the Faculty of Veterinary and Agriculture from the University of Melbourne, has reiterated, “the end goal is the incorporation of technology in food security”, especially in the face of climate change.

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Qantas Spirit of Australia’s Qbusiness section on The Vineyard of the Future.

References

Nicholls, J. (2017). The Data Revolution – Wine Boffins. Qantas Spirit of Australia. [online] November 2017, p. 118. Available at: https://www.qantas.com/infodetail/flying/inTheAir/inflightMagazine/QBusiness.pdf [Accessed 4 Nov. 2017].

Fuentes, S. and De Bei, R., 2016. Innovations and technology: Advances of the Vineyard of the Future initiative in viticultural, sensory science and technology development. Wine & Viticulture Journal, 31(3), p.53.

 

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New Paper: Assessment of beer quality based on foamability and chemical composition using computer vision algorithms, near infrared spectroscopy and artificial neural networks modelling techniques

By

Claudia Gonzalez Viejo 1, Sigfredo Fuentes 1*, Damir Torrico1, Kate Howell1, and Frank R. Dunshea1.

1 University of Melbourne, School of Agriculture and Food, Faculty of Veterinary and Agricultural Sciences, VIC 3010, Australia

* Correspondence: sfuentes@unimelb.edu.au; Tel.: +61 3 9035 9670

Journal of The Science of Food and Agriculture

Full Article: CLICK HERE

ABSTRACT:

Beer quality is mainly defined by its color, foamability and foam stability, which are influenced by the chemical composition of the product such as proteins, carbohydrates, pH and alcohol. Traditional methods to assess specific chemical compounds are usually time-consuming and costly. This study used rapid methods to evaluate 15 foam and color-related parameters using a robotic pourer (RoboBEER) and chemical fingerprinting using near infrared spectrometry (NIR) from six replicates of 21 beers from three types of fermentation. Results from NIR were used to create partial least squares regression (PLS) and artificial neural networks (ANN) models to predict four chemometrics such as pH, alcohol, Brix and maximum volume of foam.

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