Fly of the VITICOPTER

Posted: March 12, 2014 by vineyardofthefuture in About the project, News

Viticopter from the Vineyard of the future. The University of Talca (CITRA) – Chile

Drone

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We have been working in DIY technology to be applied as part of The Vineyard of The Future and it has been picked up by The University of Melbourne to develop easy to do and DIY laboratory kits. Now, students are able to access cheap and robust instrumentation organised as DIY kits, so they can assemble it, program it and acquire different kind of data from crops. This enable student to understand different physiological processes and how to monitor them for practical applications into:

Disease diagnosis

Plant water status for irrigation management

Vigour monitoring and fertiliser use

Spatial and temporal monitoring of physiological parameters using unmanned aerial and terrestrial vehicles (UAV & UTV).

 

See full video at:

http://le.unimelb.edu.au/

 

THE EXTREME EFFECTS of climate change are taking their toll on the viticulture industry, making the future of vineyards here and abroad uncertain. Which is why University of Melbourne wine science lecturer Dr Sigfredo Fuentes and a team of researchers around the world are developing a project to better arm the industry against that change. Vineyard of the Future (VoF) is being conducted in Australia, Chile, Spain and the US.

Full Article: VOF 2014 IR

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Image  —  Posted: January 8, 2014 by vineyardofthefuture in jokes

2013 in review

Posted: December 31, 2013 by vineyardofthefuture in Uncategorized

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2013 annual report for this blog.

Here’s an excerpt:

The concert hall at the Sydney Opera House holds 2,700 people. This blog was viewed about 8,500 times in 2013. If it were a concert at Sydney Opera House, it would take about 3 sold-out performances for that many people to see it.

Click here to see the complete report.

U.S. cracks open skies to testing, use of aerial drones

Posted: December 31, 2013 by vineyardofthefuture in News

US-WEATHER-NASA-HURRICANE DRONES

 

NEW YORK (Reuters) – The U.S. aviation regulator took a step toward opening the skies to aerial drones on Monday, authorizing six sites where unmanned aircraft can be tested for a variety of uses.

The Federal Aviation Administration already has approved limited use of drones in the U.S. for law enforcement, surveillance, atmospheric research and other applications.

But Monday’s move will give companies, universities and other entities locations at which to test much broader use, such as crop spraying, catching exotic-animal poachers or delivering packages.

“It provides the platform for this research to be carried out on a very large scale across the country,” Federal Aviation Administration Administrator Michael Huerta told reporters.

The first test site is expected to be open in six months and the sites will operate at least until February 2017.

The FAA said the test sites will be developed by the University of Alaska, the state of Nevada, Griffiss International Airport in New York state, the North Dakota Department of Commerce, Texas A&M University at Corpus Christi, and Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, which includes locations in New Jersey.

The FAA is required to write initial rules governing commercial operation of drones by 2015. The test sites will operate longer, allowing rules to evolve with further testing, Huerta said.

Drones are smaller and less costly alternatives to manned aircraft, and are a growing business for aerospace companies such as Boeing Co, Northrop Grumman Corp, Lockheed Martin Corp and AeroVironment Inc.

Beyond military capabilities, they also offer uses to businesses and researchers. Amazon.com Inc recently unveiled plans for drones to deliver small packages to homes.

Global spending on unmanned aircraft will almost double to $11.6 billion a year by 2023, according to the latest estimate by aviation and aerospace industry research firm Teal Group.

The Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International (AUVSI), an industry group, estimates the industry could contribute more than $80 billion to the U.S. economy over a decade and create more than 100,000 jobs.

But the vehicles also have raised privacy and safety concerns, since they could be used for spying or could interfere with already crowded airspace.

The FAA chose the six sites from 25 applications it received from 24 states.

“These test sites will give us valuable information about how best to ensure the safe introduction of this advanced technology into our nation’s skies,” Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx said in a statement.

Huerta said the FAA would first address the use of drones in small civil applications and expected to issue a proposed rule in early 2014.

(Reporting by Alwyn Scott; Editing by John Wallace and Diane Craft)

News from Chile – VoF

Posted: December 30, 2013 by vineyardofthefuture in About the project, News, Projects, Research Grant

http://www.uta.cl > Actualidad > 26/12/2013

Durante los días 18 y 19 de noviembre del presente

Importante Dr. de Australia dictó charlas en la Facultad de Ciencias Agronómicas de la UTA

Dr. Sigfredo Fuentes del Department of Agriculture and Food Systems, Melbourne School of Land&EnvironmentUniversity of Melbourne y MEMBER OF THE VINEYARD OF THE FUTURE (VoF) INITIATIVE, Australia

Publicado por Facultad de Ciencias Agronómicas

Imagen foto_00000001Durante los días 18 y 19 de noviembre del presente año, en el marco del proyecto MECESUP UTA 1102 “Especialización interactiva y práctica de los estudiantes de la Carrera de Agronomía de la Universidad de Tarapacá, para el mejoramiento del desempeño laboral en el área de riego y fertirrigación como eje principal de una agricultura sustentable”, la Universidad de Tarapacá conto con la visita del Dr. Sigfredo Fuentes delDepartment of Agriculture and Food Systems, Melbourne School of Land & Environment University of Melbourne y MEMBER OF THE VINEYARD OF THE FUTURE (VoF) INITIATIVE, Australia.

El Dr. Fuentes, es ingeniero agrónomo de la Universidad de Talca, Chile y Doctor of Philosophy(PhD) at the Centrefor Plantand Food Science(PaFS), University of Western Sydney, Australia en Fisiología de Plantas y Riego, con mas de 40 publicaciones ISI. Durante su visita, dictó varias charlas para estudiantes en la Facultad de Ciencias Agronómicas de nuestra universidad, basada en los efectos del cambio climático en la agricultura y las nuevas y emergentes tecnologías para la investigación y adaptación a estos efectos. Destacando la utilización de drones (controladores de vuelos no tripulados y automatización para la toma de datos) llamados multicopters, cámaras infrarrojas y cámaras multiespectrales.

Gracias a su experiencia de trabajo en Australia, el Dr. Fuentes explico a los alumnos cómo en ese país han optimizado el riego para fines agrícolas, con el fin de ser más eficientes en el uso del agua y así mitigar la escasez de agua producto del cambio climático que esta sufriendo ese país. Además, presentó las nuevas tecnologías utilizadas hoy en día para monitorear el estado fisiológico de las plantas y el estado hídrico del suelo, ambos a tiempo reales. Todo esto, se realiza como se menciona anteriormente, mediante el uso de multicopters, para obtener los datos de los sensores de humedad de suelo, sensores instalados en las plantas, imágenes satelitales, estaciones meteorológicas, fotos infrarrojas cercanas y lejanas, entre otras. Con esta charla, los alumnos de la carrera de agronomía de la Universidad de Tarapacá, conocieron otra realidad, y las tecnologías de punta en Australia y a nivel mundial, toman medidas para mitigar los efectos del calentamiento global, siempre ligados al ámbito agrícola. Es importante considerar, que el grupo de trabajo del Dr. Fuentes, esta utilizando técnicas que puedan ser accesible, especialmente, con los sistemas de teléfonos celulares para medir el índice foliar, obtener fotografías para subirlas a plataformas de sistemas espectrales y así, evaluar el estado hídrico de las plantas, pero a nivel de extensiones grande de cultivos. En este ámbito, se esta redactando proyecto FONDEF IDEASen conjuntocon la Universidad de Talca (CITRA), Universidad de Melbourne y la Universidad de Tarapacá, para comenzar verdadera cooperación entre las universidades y firmar los convenios respectivos.

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Dr. Sigfredo Fuentes dictando charla sobre el cambio climático en la Facultad de Ciencias Agronómicas de la Universidad de Tarapacá.