Workshop in Chile, organised by The University of Melbourne, The University of Talca (Chile) and INIA (Chile).

In this opportunity it will be presented latest advances in robotics and UAV with a case study for The Vineyard of the Future (Melbourne – Australia)

Full Program: Workshop-full
Workshop

FULL TEXT, DOWNLOAD HERE: Fuentes et-JulAug14WVJ-FIZZEye-Robot

By Sigfredo Fuentes; Bruna Lima, Maeva Caron and Kate Howell

Article to come out in the May-June issue of the Wine and Viticulture Journal

 

PourerR2

Figure 1: 3D model of the robotic pourer.

IMG_1604Pourer1

Figure 2: Inside and outside of actual pourer.

The Australian wine industry contributes strongly to the country’s economy (Lin, 2013). Australia is the sixth largest wine producer and the fourth largest wine exporter (WFA, 2013). Sparkling wine accounts for approximately 9% of the domestic wine sales and 13% of total wine imports in Australia (ABS, 2013). Wines with dissolved carbon dioxide are also economically important for several countries, France, Spain, Italy, USA, and Chile (IWSR, 2011; CIVC, 2013). Increase in temperature and carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere have shown to affect flavour and aroma of wines (Johnson and Robinson, 2013), decrease protein concentration in plants (Högy et al., 2009; Azam et al., 2013; Mishra et al., 2013) and increase alcohol in wines (Howden and Stokes, 2009). Consequently, climate change is expected to influence the final quality of sparkling wine, since several compounds, including protein concentration and alcohol are related to foam stability and the ability of the wine to produce foam (Pozo-Bayón et al., 2009; Coelho et al., 2011).

http://youtu.be/ogu654H7y8E

Figure 3: Sparkling wine pouring

The quality of sparkling wine is visually assessed by its colour, bubble behaviour, appearance (bead) and foam persistence (mousse) (Liger-Belair, 2013). However, as discussed by a number of authors, these parameters are extremely variable and are affected by pouring, reception vessel shape and type as well as temperature (Cilindre et al., 2010; Liger-Belair et al., 2012; Liger-Belair et al., 2013). Robotics and chemometrics allows us to control and monitor these parameters, and thus repeatedly measure sparkling wine for quality assessment and to correlate it with traditional measures of quality. A robotic bottle pourer has been developed to standardise time and wine volume of pouring into a standardised vessel. Images are collected automatically with a digital camera attached to the pourer and transferred to a computer. These images are then evaluated by image analysis algorithms, which convey the information into bubble size and speed, foamability (ability of the wine to produce foam), foam persistence and stability, and collar stability.

pourer3

Figure 4: Pourer in action in parallel to a sensory analysis at Moet Chandon, Yarra Valley, VIC – Australia.

As a result, this robotic pourer and image analysis algorithms, which simultaneously quantify both bubble’s individual behaviour and collectively as part of the foam, allows the development of a reproducible, easy and inexpensive method to measure sparkling wine quality. Results from this novel technology have been compared to chemometrics and sensory panel data using multivariate data analysis.

What grapevines do when everybody is sleeping?

Posted: March 30, 2014 by vineyardofthefuture in About the project, News, Research Paper

New study shows results of night-time water losses for grapevines.

By Sigfredo Fuentes

moon

Abstract:

Night-time water uptake (Sn) mainly corresponds to stem and organ rehydration and transpiration, the latter through stomata and cuticle. Nocturnal transpiration is uncoupled from photosynthesis, therefore it contributes to reduce water use efficiency (WUE). Night-time grapevine physiology was measured on field grown grapevines (cv. Shiraz) under partial root-zone drying (PRD) and deficit irrigation (Exp 1), on potted vines (cv. Tempranillo) (Exp. 2) and on potted vines (cv. Cabernet Sauvignon) on a progressive drought treatment in the glasshouse (Exp. 3). Sap flow probes using the compensated heat pulse method (cHP) were installed in vines (Exp. 1 and 3). Night-time gas exchange measurements were performed for Exp. 3. Other vine water status monitoring methods used were: midday stem water potential (Ψs) for all experiments, and abscisic acid (ABA) concentration monitored from leaf sap for Exp. 3. Results showed that Sn was parabolically correlated to Ψs measured on the previous day for all treatments and cultivars. Two distinct zones where vines exhibit different night-time behaviour within the Ψs vs Sn parabolic relationships were identified for all experiments. The differences between the two identified areas were related to the water status conditions of the vines:  i) non-water stress conditions (0 < Ψs < -1.0 MPa); ii) water stress conditions (-1.0 MPa < Ψs < -2.0 MPa). Furthermore, levels of water stress were negatively correlated to concentrations of leaf sap ABA, which helped to explain the parabolic curve found for cv. Cabernet Sauvignon.

Link to full article, click NighttimeVines

By: Sigfredo Fuentes

Presentation given at the Matlab tour 2013, Melbourne – Australia

To view proceedings CLICK HERE

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Climate change related phenomena like higher temperatures, increased carbon dioxide concentration in the atmosphere, and more frequent and intensive climatic anomalies, such as heat waves and floods, have placed great pressure on agricultural production around the world. In this scenario, agriculture research and production requires more intensive spatial and temporal monitoring of critical variables to assess the effects of climate change on plant physiology, growth, and fruit quality. Image analysis is becoming an important component in modern agriculture and horticulture. It allows the use of inexpensive devices to acquire meaningful information on crop growth, water status, and quality. In the past, these kinds of technology and analysis were too expensive and required specific know how, which was not readily available to growers. This presentation describes the tools used to solve this problem, such as automated analysis of RGB images and video of plant material, scanned images, and infrared thermal images of canopies to assess plant growth and canopy architectural parameters, leaves and fruit development and plant water status. Results from proposed analysis tools have shown similar outcomes in accuracy and robustness compared to more established techniques. The presenter has developed automated image and video analysis codes using the following MATLAB tools: Image Acquisition Toolbox™, Image Analysis Toolbox™, and Statistical Toolbox™.

Fly of the VITICOPTER

Posted: March 12, 2014 by vineyardofthefuture in About the project, News

Viticopter from the Vineyard of the future. The University of Talca (CITRA) – Chile

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We have been working in DIY technology to be applied as part of The Vineyard of The Future and it has been picked up by The University of Melbourne to develop easy to do and DIY laboratory kits. Now, students are able to access cheap and robust instrumentation organised as DIY kits, so they can assemble it, program it and acquire different kind of data from crops. This enable student to understand different physiological processes and how to monitor them for practical applications into:

Disease diagnosis

Plant water status for irrigation management

Vigour monitoring and fertiliser use

Spatial and temporal monitoring of physiological parameters using unmanned aerial and terrestrial vehicles (UAV & UTV).

 

See full video at:

http://le.unimelb.edu.au/

 

THE EXTREME EFFECTS of climate change are taking their toll on the viticulture industry, making the future of vineyards here and abroad uncertain. Which is why University of Melbourne wine science lecturer Dr Sigfredo Fuentes and a team of researchers around the world are developing a project to better arm the industry against that change. Vineyard of the Future (VoF) is being conducted in Australia, Chile, Spain and the US.

Full Article: VOF 2014 IR