Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

The Vineyard of The Future: Radio Interview Professor Steve Tyerman

Posted: September 24, 2014 by vineyardofthefuture in Uncategorized

From ABC – Rural

A project at Adelaide University will help prepare grape growers for the way climate change might affect their vines.

Called the Vineyard of the Future, the one-hectare vineyard at the University’s Waite campus will use sensors to measure vine performance under changing conditions.

Professor Steve Tyerman says the vineyard will be a test bed for technologies for growers.

“We’re talking about using imaging techniques, and special sensors that are on the vines to tell us what they’re actually up to, and how much water they’re using, how much photosynthesis is occurring.

“This could all be transmitted back to a central control point where somebody could be sitting at a computer screen, and checking on different blocks.”

Professor Tyerman sees the impact that the adoption of these technologies might have on the viticulture industry as analogous to what’s going on in the mining sector.

“In the mining industry, there’s enormous trucks carrying ore, and some companies are talking about having remote drivers in an office in Perth,” he said.

“They’re doing that now in the mining industry, and we should be thinking about that in viticulture.”

Professor Tyerman says having all this information will make grape growers better decision makers.

It will also allow them to respond quickly to extreme weather events that may spoil the wine.

LAILAI

LAI2

FULL ARTICLE:

Flight of the Viticopter (VoF – The University of Melbourne)

Aircraft: Hexacopter, eAustralis hexacopter mark 2

Pilot: Jeff Hollingworth

Place: Dookie Campus (UoM)

Date: 31st July 2014

FULL VIDEO:

 

By: Sigfredo Fuentes

As the effects of climate change on Australian agriculture become more apparent, the importance of monitoring changing weather conditions and their diverse impacts will grow to paramount importance. Flexible and scalable processes for data analysis and modelling, particularly image and sensor data, are an essential part of how we monitor and respond to our changing environment. But more than that, we must foster a new generation of scientists and engineers who possess not only the technical skills to analyse this data, but the critical thinking and innovative aptitude to turn it into more sustainable outcomes for our economies, communities, and the entire planet.    Full Article: ea Magazinei-mk8

Drone

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We have been working in DIY technology to be applied as part of The Vineyard of The Future and it has been picked up by The University of Melbourne to develop easy to do and DIY laboratory kits. Now, students are able to access cheap and robust instrumentation organised as DIY kits, so they can assemble it, program it and acquire different kind of data from crops. This enable student to understand different physiological processes and how to monitor them for practical applications into:

Disease diagnosis

Plant water status for irrigation management

Vigour monitoring and fertiliser use

Spatial and temporal monitoring of physiological parameters using unmanned aerial and terrestrial vehicles (UAV & UTV).

 

See full video at:

http://le.unimelb.edu.au/

 

2013 in review

Posted: December 31, 2013 by vineyardofthefuture in Uncategorized

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2013 annual report for this blog.

Here’s an excerpt:

The concert hall at the Sydney Opera House holds 2,700 people. This blog was viewed about 8,500 times in 2013. If it were a concert at Sydney Opera House, it would take about 3 sold-out performances for that many people to see it.

Click here to see the complete report.

By Sigfredo Fuentes; Bruna Lima, Maeva Caron and Kate Howell

PourerR2

Figure 1: 3D model of the robotic pourer.

IMG_1604Pourer1

Figure 2: Inside and outside of actual pourer.

The Australian wine industry contributes strongly to the country’s economy (Lin, 2013). Australia is the sixth largest wine producer and the fourth largest wine exporter (WFA, 2013). Sparkling wine accounts for approximately 9% of the domestic wine sales and 13% of total wine imports in Australia (ABS, 2013). Wines with dissolved carbon dioxide are also economically important for several countries, France, Spain, Italy, USA, and Chile (IWSR, 2011; CIVC, 2013). Increase in temperature and carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere have shown to affect flavour and aroma of wines (Johnson and Robinson, 2013), decrease protein concentration in plants (Högy et al., 2009; Azam et al., 2013; Mishra et al., 2013) and increase alcohol in wines (Howden and Stokes, 2009). Consequently, climate change is expected to influence the final quality of sparkling wine, since several compounds, including protein concentration and alcohol are related to foam stability and the ability of the wine to produce foam (Pozo-Bayón et al., 2009; Coelho et al., 2011).

Figure 3: Sparkling wine pouring

The quality of sparkling wine is visually assessed by its colour, bubble behaviour, appearance (bead) and foam persistence (mousse) (Liger-Belair, 2013). However, as discussed by a number of authors, these parameters are extremely variable and are affected by pouring, reception vessel shape and type as well as temperature (Cilindre et al., 2010; Liger-Belair et al., 2012; Liger-Belair et al., 2013). Robotics and chemometrics allows us to control and monitor these parameters, and thus repeatedly measure sparkling wine for quality assessment and to correlate it with traditional measures of quality. A robotic bottle pourer has been developed to standardise time and wine volume of pouring into a standardised vessel. Images are collected automatically with a digital camera attached to the pourer and transferred to a computer. These images are then evaluated by image analysis algorithms, which convey the information into bubble size and speed, foamability (ability of the wine to produce foam), foam persistence and stability, and collar stability.

pourer3

Figure 4: Pourer in action in parallel to a sensory analysis at Moet Chandon, Yarra Valley, VIC – Australia.

As a result, this robotic pourer and image analysis algorithms, which simultaneously quantify both bubble’s individual behaviour and collectively as part of the foam, allows the development of a reproducible, easy and inexpensive method to measure sparkling wine quality. Results from this novel technology have been compared to chemometrics and sensory panel data using multivariate data analysis.