Archive for the ‘Research Paper’ Category

By: Sigfredo Fuentes

As the effects of climate change on Australian agriculture become more apparent, the importance of monitoring changing weather conditions and their diverse impacts will grow to paramount importance. Flexible and scalable processes for data analysis and modelling, particularly image and sensor data, are an essential part of how we monitor and respond to our changing environment. But more than that, we must foster a new generation of scientists and engineers who possess not only the technical skills to analyse this data, but the critical thinking and innovative aptitude to turn it into more sustainable outcomes for our economies, communities, and the entire planet.    Full Article: ea Magazinei-mk8

Download Full article by clicking here: IRScannerFuentes et alscan

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Vineyard of the Future initiative is a multinational project that aims to establish a fully instrumented vineyard using wireless connectivity and automated data gathering and analysis. It also aims to be a test-bed for new technology and a trial site for investigating the potential effects of climate change on viticulture in Australia, Chile, US and Spain. Researchers involved with the project have been developing an infrared scanner to assess plant water status at a fraction of the cost of infrared cameras and with the same comparable results.

IRscanner

What grapevines do when everybody is sleeping?

Posted: March 30, 2014 by vineyardofthefuture in About the project, News, Research Paper

New study shows results of night-time water losses for grapevines.

By Sigfredo Fuentes

moon

Abstract:

Night-time water uptake (Sn) mainly corresponds to stem and organ rehydration and transpiration, the latter through stomata and cuticle. Nocturnal transpiration is uncoupled from photosynthesis, therefore it contributes to reduce water use efficiency (WUE). Night-time grapevine physiology was measured on field grown grapevines (cv. Shiraz) under partial root-zone drying (PRD) and deficit irrigation (Exp 1), on potted vines (cv. Tempranillo) (Exp. 2) and on potted vines (cv. Cabernet Sauvignon) on a progressive drought treatment in the glasshouse (Exp. 3). Sap flow probes using the compensated heat pulse method (cHP) were installed in vines (Exp. 1 and 3). Night-time gas exchange measurements were performed for Exp. 3. Other vine water status monitoring methods used were: midday stem water potential (Ψs) for all experiments, and abscisic acid (ABA) concentration monitored from leaf sap for Exp. 3. Results showed that Sn was parabolically correlated to Ψs measured on the previous day for all treatments and cultivars. Two distinct zones where vines exhibit different night-time behaviour within the Ψs vs Sn parabolic relationships were identified for all experiments. The differences between the two identified areas were related to the water status conditions of the vines:  i) non-water stress conditions (0 < Ψs < -1.0 MPa); ii) water stress conditions (-1.0 MPa < Ψs < -2.0 MPa). Furthermore, levels of water stress were negatively correlated to concentrations of leaf sap ABA, which helped to explain the parabolic curve found for cv. Cabernet Sauvignon.

Link to full article, click NighttimeVines

Moderate wine consumption and depression

Posted: September 4, 2013 by vineyardofthefuture in News, Research Paper

 

glass

Alcoholic beverages are widely consumed. Depression, the most prevalent mental disorder worldwide, has been related to alcohol intake. We aimed to prospectively assess the association between alcohol intake and incident depression using repeated measurements of alcohol intake. “One drink a day, preferentially wine, may help prevent depression,” said lead researcher Dr. Miguel Martinez-Gonzalez, chair of the department of preventive medicine and public health at the University of Navarra, in Pamplona.

Link to full article: 1741-7015-11-192

 

 

By Sigfredo Fuentes1* , Roberta De Bei2  and Stephen Tyerman2

1 University of Melbourne, Melbourne School of Land and Environment, Victoria 3010, Australia

2 School of Agriculture Food and Wine and Waite Research Institute, The University of Adelaide, Plant Research Centre,

Waite Campus, PMB 1 Glen Osmond, SA 5064, Australia

* Corresponding author: sfuentes@unimelb.edu.au

Recent research has boosted understanding of the dynamics of night-time transpiration and water

rehydration of plants and grapevines, with the aim of obtaining amelioration strategies to maximise

water use efficiency for crops under a challenging climate.

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Read full article here: Nighttimegrapevines

 

 

 

Dr Sigfredo Fuentes (Lecturer in Wine Science. The University of Melbourne – Australia)

Full article: Press here: ChileriegoInterview

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Winetech

WORKSHOP: New and Emerging Technologies for your Vineyard

Convenors: Dr Sigfredo Fuentes and Dr Roberta De Bei

Many people think that the ‘I, Robot’ vision from Isaac Asimov is not too far away from reality.

We have seen everyday more and more media coverage of the use of drones and robotic

technology for research in viticulture and agriculture in general. Automated systems can carry

instrumentation that enables the acquisition and analysis of data using contact, short and

long range remote sensing techniques. This workshop will explore the state of the art of

instrumentation and research to implement these systems in viticulture and winemaking.

Some of the technologies and instrumentation that will be covered range in applications from

the field to the cellar. The structure of this workshop will be in the soil – plant – atmosphere

context.

COST: AUD$ 150

WEB LINK: http://awitc.com.au

Blue_Moon_-_Hand-held

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NEW PAPER:

Fuentes, S., Mahadevan, M., Bonada, M., Skewes, M. and Cox, J.W. 2013. Night-time sap flow is parabolically linked to midday water potential for field grown almond trees. Irrigation Science. DOI: 10.1007/s00271-013-0403-3.

LINK: Night-time sap flow is parabolically linked to midday water potential for field grown almond trees

Similar results were found for nocturnal water uptake in grapevines from cultivars: Shiraz, Tempranillo and Cabernet Sauvignon.

Fuentes S., De Bei R., Collins M., Escalona J.M., Medrano H., Tyerman S. 2013. Night-time responses to water supply in grapevines (Vitis vinifera L.) under deficit irrigation and partial root-zone drying. Agricultural Water Management (Submitted).

Recent research has helped to break the paradigm stating that C3 and C4 plants do not transpire at night-time due to complete stomata closure. It has been shown that plant water losses by transpiration at night-time can reach levels between 10-60% compared to day-time depending on the level of aridity and water stress. Since night-time transpiration is not coupled to photosynthesis it contributes to decrease water use efficiency. Furthermore, for non-water stress situations, night-time transpiration is highly correlated to vapour pressure deficit. Therefore, considering that climate change models have forecasted that night-time temperatures will increase at a higher rate compared to diurnal temperatures, night-time transpiration might be exacerbated in future global warming scenarios. Considering these new insights from research, it is worrying that night-time transpiration has not been considered in evapotranspiration models neither for small scale (irrigation scheduling of crops) nor for large scales (catchments and forests water use estimations). This issue creates a big problem for water footprint, water balance and evapotranspiration estimations that affect growers, irrigation practitioners, catchment water modelling and government policy. Our research has helped to characterise the dynamics of night-time transpiration and water rehydration of plants to obtain amelioration strategies for crops to maximise water use efficiency under a challenging climate.

Figures below: Parabolic relationships found when comparing night-time water uptake by Almond trees (Sn) and tree water status measured as stem water potential (MPa). Figure 1 shows data taking the averaged values between probes located in the North-East and South West and Figure 2 shows data separating these probes. This example demonstrate that for larger trees it is important to have more than 1 set of probes to account for sap flow variability according to weather conditions and soil moisture.

Figure 1

Fig 3a

Figure 2

Fig 3b

Winetech

WORKSHOP: New and Emerging Technologies for your Vineyard

Convenors: Dr Sigfredo Fuentes and Dr Roberta De Bei

Many people think that the ‘I, Robot’ vision from Isaac Asimov is not too far away from reality.

We have seen everyday more and more media coverage of the use of drones and robotic

technology for research in viticulture and agriculture in general. Automated systems can carry

instrumentation that enables the acquisition and analysis of data using contact, short and

long range remote sensing techniques. This workshop will explore the state of the art of

instrumentation and research to implement these systems in viticulture and winemaking.

Some of the technologies and instrumentation that will be covered range in applications from

the field to the cellar. The structure of this workshop will be in the soil – plant – atmosphere

context.

COST: AUD$ 150

WEB LINK: http://awitc.com.au

The following papers will be presented at the IX International Symposium on Grapevine Physiology and Biotechnology to be held in La Serena – Chile from the 21st to the 26th of April 2013. These papers are a common effort from The Vineyard of the Future members from Australia, Spain and Chile.

1) Using Infrared Thermal Images To Detect Smoke Contamination For Different Grapevine Cultivars. 

S. Fuentes, R. De Bei, K. Wilkinson, R Ristic and S.D. Tyerman

Link to abstract: IR smoke

2) Infrared Thermal Images Of Grapevines: From Manual to Complete Automated Analysis.

C. Poblete-Echeverria, S. Fuentes, R. De Bei, MP Diago , S. Ortega-Farias and J. Tardaguila

Link to abstract: IR analysis

3) Using smartphones and tablet PCs for canopy architecture assessment to upscale physiological parameters: LAICanopy© App. 

 S. Fuentes, R. De Bei and S.D. Tyerman.

Link to abstract: AppLAI